How the Law Destroys Equality & Protects the Powerful; Glenn Greenwald and Professor Norm Chomsky

This is truly a must watch video. Glenn Greenwald and Professor Norm Chomsky sit down to have a serious discussion about the rule of law, the way it’s applied, a bit of  history and more. This is a very thoughtful discussion between two very thoughtful men who aren’t  grinding a political exe, or a point of view; just two very well educated, well read men in pursuit of the truth sharing ideas, opinions, perspective as well as experience……….and both of these two men have plenty of experience. You can read their bio’s from Wikipedia below.

About Glenn Greenwald (From Wikipedia)

glenn-greenwaldGlenn Edward Greenwald (born March 6, 1967) is an American lawyer, journalist and author. He was a columnist for Guardian US from August 2012 to October 2013.[2][3][4] He was a columnist for Salon.com from 2007 to 2012, and an occasional contributor to The Guardian.[5][6][7] Greenwald worked as a constitutional and civil rights litigator. At Salon he contributed as a columnist and blogger, focusing on political and legal topics.[8] He has also contributed to other newspapers and political news magazines, including The New York Times,[9][10][11] the Los Angeles Times,[12] The American Conservative,[13] The National Interest,[14] and In These Times.[15][16] In February 2014 he became, along with Laura Poitras and Jeremy Scahill, one of the founding editors of The Intercept.[17]

Greenwald was named by Foreign Policy magazine as one of the Top 100 Global Thinkers of 2013.[18] Four of the five books he has written have been on The New York Times Best Sellers list. Greenwald is a frequent speaker on college campuses, including Harvard Law School, Yale Law School, the University of Pennsylvania, Brown University, UCLA School of Law, the University of Wisconsin, and the University of Maryland. He frequently appears on various radio and television programs.

Greenwald has received awards including the first Izzy Award for independent journalism, in 2009,[19] and the 2010 Online Journalism Award for Best Commentary.[20] In June 2013 Greenwald became widely known after The Guardian published the first of a series of reports detailing United States and British global surveillance programs, based on classified documents disclosed by Edward Snowden.[21][22] The series on which Greenwald worked, along with others, won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service.[23][24] His reporting on the National Security Agency (NSA) won numerous other awards around the world, including top investigative journalism prizes from the George Polk Award for National Security Reporting,[25] the 2013 Online Journalism Awards,[26] the Esso Award for Excellence in Reporting in Brazil for his articles in O Globo on NSA mass surveillance of Brazilians (becoming the first foreigner to win the award),[27] the 2013 Libertad de Expresion Internacional award from Argentinian magazine Perfil,[28] and the 2013 Pioneer Award from the Electronic Frontier Foundation.[29]

Greenwald lives in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the hometown of his partner, David Michael Miranda.[30][31][32][33][34] Greenwald has said his residence in Brazil is the result of an American law, the Defense of Marriage Act, barring federal recognition of same-sex marriages, which prevented his partner from receiving a visa to reside in the United States with him.[31]

About Professor Norm Chomsky

ChomskyAvram Noam Chomsky (/ˈnm ˈɒmski/; born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher,[20][21] cognitive scientist, logician,[22][23][24] political commentator and activist. Sometimes described as the “father of modern linguistics”,[25][26] Chomsky is also a major figure in analytic philosophy.[20] He has spent most of his career at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he is currently Professor Emeritus, and has authored over 100 books. He has been described as a prominent cultural figure, and was voted the “world’s top public intellectual” in a 2005 poll.[27]

Born to a middle-class Ashkenazi Jewish family in Philadelphia, Chomsky developed an early interest in anarchism from relatives in New York City. He later undertook studies in linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania, where he obtained his BA, MA, and PhD, while from 1951 to 1955 he was appointed to Harvard University‘s Society of Fellows. In 1955 he began work at MIT, soon becoming a significant figure in the field of linguistics for his publications and lectures on the subject. He is credited as the creator or co-creator of the Chomsky hierarchy, the universal grammar theory, and the Chomsky–Schützenberger theorem. Chomsky also played a major role in the decline of behaviorism, and was especially critical of the work of B.F. Skinner.[28][29] In 1967 he gained public attention for his vocal opposition to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War, in part through his essay The Responsibility of Intellectuals, and came to be associated with the New Left while being arrested on multiple occasions for his anti-war activism. While expanding his work in linguistics over subsequent decades, he also developed the propaganda model of media criticism with Edward S. Herman. Following his retirement from active teaching, he has continued his vocal public activism, praising the Occupy movement for example.

Chomsky has been a highly influential academic figure throughout his career, and was cited within the field of Arts and Humanities more often than any other living scholar between 1980 and 1992. He was also the eighth most cited scholar overall within the Arts and Humanities Citation Index during the same period.[30][31][32][33] His work has influenced fields such as artificial intelligence, cognitive science, computer science, logic, mathematics, music theory and analysis, political science, programming language theory and psychology.[32][33][34][35][36] Chomsky continues to be well known as a political activist, and a leading critic of U.S. foreign policy, state capitalism, and the mainstream news media. Ideologically, he aligns himself with anarcho-syndicalism and libertarian socialism.[37]